The Jumblies

Instrumentation: SSA + piano
Duration: 5:51
Commission: The Peninsula Women’s Chorus
Premiere: 12/4/11
The Peninsula Women’s Chorus, Martin Benvenuto, Conductor
St. Patrick’s Seminary, Menlo Park, CA

Program Note:
The Jumblies, a setting of the poem of that name by Edward Lear, was commissioned by the Peninsula Women’s Chorus, with conductor Martin Benvenuto, in memory of chorister Mary Ager. It is dedicated to her. Mary’s sister, Lois Hinderlie, offered several wonderful suggestions, including this poem. Other members of the chorus also made excellent suggestions. However, when I learned about Mary, and her deep interest in Victorian literature, including earning a PhD in the subject, I felt that the Lear poem was especially appropriate. The images are delightful and the whole poem is charming. Yet, there is a more serious message that one should set out on one’s journey without worrying about what others think. In the end, they may well wish they had come along themselves!  Scored for treble chorus and piano, the music closely mirrors the vivid images of the text. It is my hope that Mary, with her inclusive musical taste and zest for singing, would have enjoyed it.
–JS

Singer’s Quote: 
“I wanted to let you know that The Jumblies is one of my all-time favorite pieces in the PWC repertoire! I have been singing with the chorus since 1978, so I’ve experienced a lot of music. This piece captures the spirit of Mary Ager so well–she was a close friend of mine.” –Kathy Plock (member of the Peninsula Women’s Chorus)

The Jumblies

by Edward Lear

They went to sea in a Sieve, they did,
In a Sieve they went to sea:
In spite of all their friends could say,
On a winter’s morn, on a stormy day,
In a Sieve they went to sea!
And when the Sieve turned round and round,
And every one cried, ‘You’ll all be drowned!’
They called aloud, ‘Our Sieve ain’t big,
But we don’t care a button! we don’t care a fig!
In a Sieve we’ll go to sea!’
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.

They sailed away in a Sieve, they did,
In a Sieve they sailed so fast,
With only a beautiful pea-green veil
Tied with a riband by way of a sail,
To a small tobacco-pipe mast;
And every one said, who saw them go,
‘O won’t they be soon upset, you know!
For the sky is dark, and the voyage is long,
And happen what may, it’s extremely wrong
In a Sieve to sail so fast!’
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.

They sailed away in a Sieve, they did,
In a Sieve they sailed so fast,
With only a beautiful pea-green veil
Tied with a riband by way of a sail,
To a small tobacco-pipe mast;
And every one said, who saw them go,
‘O won’t they be soon upset, you know!
For the sky is dark, and the voyage is long,
And happen what may, it’s extremely wrong
In a Sieve to sail so fast!’
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.

And all night long they sailed away;
And when the sun went down,
They whistled and warbled a moony song
To the echoing sound of a coppery gong,
In the shade of the mountains brown.
‘O Timballo! How happy we are,
When we live in a sieve and a crockery-jar,
And all night long in the moonlight pale,
We sail away with a pea-green sail,
In the shade of the mountains brown!’
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.

They sailed to the Western Sea, they did,
To a land all covered with trees,
And they bought an Owl, and a useful Cart,
And a pound of Rice, and a Cranberry Tart,
And a hive of silvery Bees.
And they bought a Pig, and some green Jack-daws,
And a lovely Monkey with lollipop paws,
And forty bottles of Ring-Bo-Ree,
And no end of Stilton Cheese.
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.

And in twenty years they all came back,
In twenty years or more,
And every one said, ‘How tall they’ve grown!’
For they’ve been to the Lakes, and the Torrible Zone,
And the hills of the Chankly Bore;
And they drank their health, and gave them a feast
Of dumplings made of beautiful yeast;
And everyone said, ‘If we only live,
We too will go to sea in a Sieve,—
To the hills of the Chankly Bore!’
Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
And they went to sea in a Sieve.

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